MDMA dampens the encoding and retrieval of emotional memories, study finds

MDMA appears to have a stronger effect on emotional memories than non-emotional memories, according to new research. The finding may explain why the drug has beneficial effects for people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and similar psychiatric conditions.

MDMA, more commonly known as the illegal club drug ecstasy or molly, promotes strong feelings of empathy in users. Preliminary research has found that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy reduces symptoms in people with treatment-resistant PTSD.

Fewer heart attack patients die when top cardiologists are away at conferences, study finds

Heart attack patients are more likely to survive when top cardiologists are not in the hospital, a new study suggests.

Researchers at Harvard Medical School found that when heart specialists are away at academic conferences, the survival rate at their hospitals actually improves.

Gambling losses in Australia are at a record high after punters frittered away almost A$24bn

That equates to $1000 per person living in Australia in the last year.

Gambling stress pushes more than 400 Australians to suicide each year, a figure that has been given credence by Australia's Productivity Commission. Mr Costello mostly blames devices that are "built for addiction, releasing the dopamine (a mood-setting chemical) that hits your brain with the force of cocaine."

Soy Boys

Button mushrooms are carcinogenic

Legalizing Recreational Marijuana in Colorado Reversed a 14-Year Trend of Rising Opioid-Related Deaths

At the heart of the marijuana debate is one question: Can weed actually provide health benefits that outweigh its risks? According to a recently published study in the American Journal of Public Health, the case that it can has been made sufficiently stronger.

The recently published study from researchers at the University of North Texas and University of Florida examined the impact of recreational cannabis' legalization in Colorado, which began selling the drug for adult use in Jan. 2014, as compared to opioid-related deaths. Opioids are a class of prescription medicines typically administered to treat various types of chronic and severe pain. They can also be a highly addictive medication that, in 2015, led to 20,101 related prescription deaths, according to the American Society of Addiction Medicine.

This Is How Legal Cannabis Is Improving Public Health

Legal cannabis access is associated with numerous favorable public health outcomes. Here are just a few of them.

Changes in the legal status of cannabis is associated with significant reductions in opioid-related mortality. Data published in 2014 in JAMA Internal Medicine reports that medical cannabis regulation is associated with year-over-year declines in overall opioid-related mortality, including heroin overdose deaths. Specifically, medicalization states experienced a 20 percent decrease in opioid deaths as compared to non-medicalized states within one year. This decrease climbed to 33 percent by year six. Other studies have separately linked the establishment of both dispensaries and adult use retailers with reductions in opioid deaths. Traffic fatalities involving opioid-positive drivers has also fallen in states that have implemented medical marijuana laws.

Fluoride Exposure Correlated To Lower IQ

Researchers in Toronto, Canada have published a peer-reviewed study in Environmental Health Perspectives which finds that increased exposure to fluoride in utero is associated with lower IQ in children.

In a study spanning more than a decade, the researchers analyzed 1,576 samples from nearly 300 sets of mothers and children in Mexico where fluoride is not added to public water supplies, and is instead absorbed through naturally occurring concentrations in public water and fluoridated products. The IQ of children included in the study was tested twice up to the age of 12, which revealed a decrease in IQ scores for every .5 milligram-per-liter increase in fluoride exposure beyond 0.8 milligrams per liter of a pregnant mother's urine.

Texas Issues First Medical Marijuana License To Help Treat Epilepsy

Texas has issued its first medical marijuana license to help treat epilepsy. Two more companies are expected to be awarded licenses soon.

Licenses are being issued under the Texas Compassionate Use Act, signed into law in 2015, by Gov. Greg Abbott. The companies were selected from more than 40 applicants in May, and have undergone a series of facility inspections. The companies face strict state regulations concerning customer base numbers and product formulation.

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